What Do I Do if I Have COVID-19 and my Ex-Spouse Cannot Care for Our Kids?

What Do I Do if I Have COVID-19 and my Ex-Spouse Cannot Care for Our Kids?

The current health state of New York and the rest of the country with the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-10) is causing a great deal of uncertainty for many people. Lives have been changed in different ways, from self isolation to possible hospitalization. It is important to have a plan in place in the event that this illness were to unfortunately impact your family. For example, if you contract the Coronavirus and your former spouse is unable to take care of your children, there are steps that can be taken in an estate plan to make sure your children are cared for during this time.

The first thing to remember is that a plan should be in place before any illness may happen. This ensures that you are prepared in the event that the circumstances do affect your family. It is possible to plan ahead by establishing a type of power of attorney. This names a legal guardian who can care for your child in the event that you are not feeling well and your former spouse cannot take care of your children. In these situations, a Limited Power of Attorney may be best, as it grants another individual certain rights to act in designated areas within a time limit. This can include becoming a legal guardian during the Coronavirus outbreak. Without this in place, if parents are unable to care for their children, a relative can go to the court to be appointed as kinship legal guardian.

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