Who’s involved in mediation?

Who’s involved in mediation?

Mediation can be a great way for couples to end their marriage. Through mediation, spouses can meet with a neutral third party to decide on marital issues. The mediator does not make decisions for the couple. Rather, the mediator guides the conversation along to ensure it is being productive. Spouses are both present for these sessions. They are also able to bring their attorneys along with them to feel better prepared. Since mediation allows for an open discussion, it can encourage spouses to be more honest with one another. It may also give them the privacy they need to speak more freely rather than in a court.  

Divorce mediation gives spouses the control they want to decide on marital issues. During this process, they are able to make decisions that can ultimately affect the rest of their lives. They can include their insights into how issues such as child custody should be handled. By doing this in mediation sessions, they will not have a judge making decisions for them in court. This can give them a more favorable outcome. Along with their spouse, they may be able to come to conclusions that satisfy both parties.

Can I end mediation?

While mediation is an amicable way to get a divorce, it may not be for everyone. Mediation requires the cooperation of both spouses to prove to be a productive and overall successful process. If the parties are unable to cooperate, they will not be able to decide on outcomes together to solve their issues. This can prove to be an ineffective process. If mediation is not working out the way you hoped it would or your spouse is not cooperating, you have the right to end the process at any time. At this time, your divorce may become contested and cause you to enter into litigation to have a judge decide on issues.

Zimmet Law Group, P.C. is an experienced team of attorneys guiding clients through matters of estate planning and administration, divorce and family law, real estate, commercial litigation, business law, bankruptcy, and landlord-tenant law. If you require the services of an effective New York City attorney, contact our firm today to schedule a consultation.

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